?

Log in

Allah Sulu's Massive Tool
 
[Most Recent Entries] [Calendar View] [Friends]

Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in Allah Sulu's Massive Tool's LiveJournal:

[ << Previous 20 ]
Wednesday, January 11th, 2017
8:32 am
[allah_sulu]
Wednesday, April 27th, 2016
10:17 am
[allah_sulu]
[Update] Allah Sulu’s Massive Tool version 3.8.1
I just noticed that it’s been over a year since the last update of Allah_Sulu’s Massive Tool, so here’s the latest version with all of the various tweaks I’ve made since then. The new version can be downloaded in a ZIP archive of files, which can be extracted into a new folder (for first-time installers) or into your existing Massive Tool directory over the current files (make sure that you are not running the Massive Tool while you’re trying to install/extract the update).

New changes to the Massive Tool include:

  • The “Edit → Select to Top” and “Edit → Select to End” commands have been removed from the menu, as well as the associated arrow buttons from the toolbar (which allowed movement or selection to top/end depending on whether you clicked or right-clicked) because all the code I wrote for those options duplicated capabilities already in Windows, as explained here. To move to top/bottom, click Ctrl-Home and Ctrl-End; to select from the cursor to the top/bottom, click Ctrl-Shift-Home and Ctrl-Shift-End. (Related: “File → Save As…” now has F12 as its shortcut key.)
  • Also, Ctrl-Delete will delete a word to the right of the cursor, and Shift-Delete will delete a word to the left of the cursor (in both cases stopping when a space character or line break is hit).
  • On the “Document” tab of the “Edit → Preferences…” screen, two new options have been added to the “Quotes” pulldown menu: ❛Heavy Single❜ and ❝Heavy Double❞ quotation marks. These are accessed by selection a block of text and then clicking CTRL-Q or clicking on the Toolbar button with the quotation marks. (If you have double quotation marks selected, then right-clicking on that button will give you the corresponding single quotes, and vice versa.)
  • The “Insert → Line Break” command has been removed from the menu and toolbar, and can now be accessed (inserting one or more <br /> tags into the editor) simply by hitting CTRL-M.
  • The Blockquote button has also been removed from the “Insert” toolbar, as the <blockquote> tags are already an option on the “Paragraph” button (as well as through the “Insert → Paragraph…” menu option). Right-clicking on the “Paragraph” button applies whatever settings were last selected on the “Insert → Paragraph…” screen without re-involing the screen.
  • On the “HTML → Anchor / Links…” screen, a couple of additional options (overline and double) have been added to the “Underline” menu.
  • A “Scrollbox” button has been added to the “HTML → Font…” screen, which works in conjunction with the “Height” and “Width” parameters (which are also used by the “Marquee” command, so that “Marquee” and “Scrollbox” are mutually exclusive) as well as most of the other options on that screen. See more about scrollboxes here.
  • I have improved the embedding codes on the “HTML → Images…” screen. In addition to images like JPEGs and GIFs, you can enter the URLs of media files like MP3s, SWFs, and MP4s; the Massive Tool can generate <embed> codes for them, along with HTML5 <audio> and <video> tags where appropriate. This capability already existed for some of those file types, but the list has been expanded and the HTML5 tags have been added. Use the “Width” and “Height” attributes on the “HTML → Images…” screen to resize the embedded content.
  • Some of the options on the “HTML → Lists…” screen have changed.
  • There are a couple of new options for the “LJ → LJ Like…” command. They aren’t listed in the LJ FAQ yet, but you can now specify Tumblr and Surfingbird instead or or in addition to the other social networking sites. (It’s possible that there are even more choices available, but we won’t know for sure what the full list is until LJ updates their FAQ.)
  • The “LJ → Display LJ Tags” command and associated toolbar button have been removed. Most of this functionality can be duplicated by executing the Filter-LJ.RIM macro file.
  • The “Window → Open All Links” option has been removed from the menu and the toolbar; this operation can be activated with a simple macro contained in the openlinks.rim file.
  • There are also no longer toolbar buttons for the “Window → Tile Horizontally” or “Window → Tile Vertically” options, although there are new key combinations (CTRL-ALT-H and CTRL-ALT-V, respectively) for those options.
  • The “Color” selection window, which appears throughout the Massive Tool, now has five “Random” buttons next to the inputs. The button next to the color name pulldown will select one of the 140 color names at random. The buttons next to the red, green, and blue inputs will each select a number from zero through 255 for that color. Finally, the button next to the HTML input (with the hex code) will select one of the 216 “web safe” colors. (Use the three buttons for red, green, and blue to randomly select one of the 16,777,216 colors available rather than a subset of the full spectrum that the names or hex code buttons provide.)
  • The built-in FORTH-based language has been tweaked a bit. Make sure to replace all of the old RIM files with new versions (also included in the ZIP archive).
Sunday, April 3rd, 2016
8:24 pm
[allah_sulu]
[Update] Allah Sulu's Text Converter
   It’s been about a year since I last mentioned my Massive Tool Text Converter, so I figured I’d mention all of the changes I’ve made since it was last profiled. (I also decided not to discuss it on April Fool’s Day this time around, since no one believes anything they read online on April Fool’s Day… Or, at least, they shouldn’t (without due consideration, that is). Anyway, the first thing that’s obvious comparing the web page from last year with the web page as it is now is that there are far more options available:



   The user enters text in the first text box, which is shaded in a lighter green than the rest of the page, and then gets converted text in eight different white-shaded boxes below. Most of the boxes have controls underneath them for selecting a variety of options.
   The first output text box can return either “Γαuχ Grεεκ” or “Fдцж Яцssɪди” text, both of which were available on the original page, and a third option I call “ᔕ⊂ᚱ|ᛒᛒᒪ∈.” The user can toggle between the three options by using the radio buttons beneath the text box. For Scribble text, you may want to mix upper- and lower-case letters in your input so that the output characters are not all uniform. Note that entering “+)” will give you the hammer-and-sickle character () in the Faux Russian converter. You can also get different results with “:)” or “:(” emoticons.
   The next output box is for “Ⓑⓤⓑⓑⓛⓔ Ⓣⓔⓧⓣ”, and comes with a few new options. You can choose to have spaces replaced by empty bubbles, or to have (some) punctuation characters also enclosed in bubbles, and even display numbers in a few different ways: standard (①⑨), inverse (❶❾), two-digit (), and two-digit inverse (). Note that twenty is the highest two-digit number that you can display in a single inverse bubble, and that fifty is the highest that you can display in a standard bubble. If you entered “:)” in the text box, you can use the inverse button to get an inverse smiley () instead of the regular one ().
   The third text box returns the text as a string of words using the military “ALPHA BRAVO CHARLIE” radio callsigns for each letter. I used to work with people who insisted that things (like passwords or URLs) be spelled out that way over the phone, and I never bothered to memorize that code, so I used to use a macro in the Massive Tool to do the conversion for me. Well, now it’s in this Text Converter web page as well. (If there’s ever a need to, I can add controls to this text box for different versions of the alphabet callsigns, as I think different military branches and/or organizations have slightly different versions.)
   The fourth text box is for “ƨbяɒwʞͻɒᗺ” and “uʍop-ǝpısdn” text. There are a number of sites that convert to upside-down text (using lower-case letters only), but I also worked out backwards text – and allow for all upper-case, all lower-case, or a mixture in the converted text. I also tried, where possible, to find upside-down and backwards versions of other characters, not just letters, but with mixed success. Not every character has an upside-down or backwards variant in unicode.
   The fifth text box returns the user’s text converted into Germanic Runes (ᚨᛚᛗᚩᛊᛏ ᛚᛁᚴᛖ ᛞᚹᚨᚱᚡᛖᚾ), and two different Japanese character sets: Hiragana (ひらがな) and Katakana (かたかな). All but Katakana were already available last year BUT now, after you’ve created and posted the converted text, someone can copy and paste the runes/hiragana/katakana back into the Text Converter to reverse the process. Finally, just for fun, when using Germanic Runes numbers are converted into Roman numerals. Why? Why not?
   The sixth text box provides for a variety of text styles, including unicode equivalents of standard text styles. Some of them use characters at the high end of the unicode chart (above u+FFFF) and may not display properly on all websites or in all fonts/browsers.
   The seventh text box is based on an idea that I saw elsewhere, but greatly expanded upon. It’s for use on platforms like Twitter which limit the number of characters you can enter at a given time. Many unicode characters are composed of multiple letters, or at least resemble multiple letters, so that one could use one of those characters in the place of two or more regular letters to expand the length of the message that you can fit within a limited number of characters. Again, however, not every reader will be able to see those special characters (especially, from what I've seen, people reading Twitter on their cell phones), so caution is still recommended. This converter also creates some other graphics characters, such as “<3” being converter to “”.
   The last text box on this page, just as it was a year ago, is primarily for diacritics, but with a few other options as well. You can use these characters to underline words in Twitter or Facebook, although (in the former case) that will add to your tweet's character count.
Wednesday, September 30th, 2015
6:34 pm
[debiru]
64 bit support
it's 2015 & i guess i still care ab my journal presentation since i'm not leaving until the site goes under. anyway, i tried to install this program and my laptop ' can't run it '. i'm using windows 8.1. i just wanted to make some custom userheads and have formatting on some things be a bit easier.
Wednesday, May 27th, 2015
5:52 pm
[allah_sulu]
LiveJournal в лицах (LiveJournal People)
 


   I just saw this Russian commercial for LiveJournal, which is basically a montage of different userheads to illustrate their slogan: “LiveJournal объединяет множество людей, уникальных и особенных, с совершенно разными увлечениями, и каждый здесь находит что-то интересное для себя. Присоединяйтесь!” (“LiveJournal combines multitudes of unique and special people, with very different hobbies; and here everyone finds something interesting for themselves. Join!”) Of course, what I find interesting is that one of the heads they featured was one that I designed and they picked up (allah sulu). It’s based on a character called Captain Feathersword (@capfs_wiggle), which you can see me cosplaying in my avatar.
Friday, May 16th, 2014
9:09 pm
[allah_sulu]
Thanks for Nothing, LJ
   LiveJournal has once again made a whole mess of changes that nobody wanted, screwing up user's coding even further. In this post there should be space in between the pictures, and borders around those which are links – I used the exact same HTML I always use – but those elements (border="2" on the images, cellspacing="8" for the table) are not being properly displayed. I can’t even guess how many other codes and properties have been needlessly and senselessly tossed out the window.
5:25 pm
[allah_sulu]

⅕ ⅖  

Friday, April 18th, 2014
5:24 pm
[allah_sulu]
.тxɘT ƨbяɒwʞͻɒᗺ ƨɒʜ woи ɘиiM .тxɘт bɘqqilʇ ɘvɒʜ ƨɘтiƨ ʇo ƨтo⅃
Tuesday, April 1st, 2014
6:34 pm
[allah_sulu]
Text Conversion Routines
   Some of you are familiar with ⓑⓤⓑⓑⓛⓔⓣⓔⓧⓣ.ⓞⓡⓖ (I’ve discussed it here before). You type plaintext into a input box, and it converts all of the letters into Unicode circled characters which you can then copy and paste into LJ, Facebook, Google+, Twitter, or just about any other site where you post or comment. The problem, however, is that that site only replaces the ⓛⓔⓣⓣⓔⓡⓢ with bubble characters – all other characters are left unaltered (even though Unicode contains circled number characters, and some punctuation as well). This is why, for some time now, on the rare occasions when I wanted to convert some text into Ⓑⓤⓑⓑⓛⓔ◯Ⓣⓔⓧⓣ, I used a macro in the Massive Tool to do it for me rather than use that site.
   The same goes for the related ʇxǝʇ dıןɟ pages (ǝuo uɐɥʇ ǝɹoɯ s,ǝɹǝɥʇ) which provide you with inverted Unicode characters to use in place if the plaintext you enter. The pages only recognize and flip a small subset of the standard ASCII characters – to be fair, Unicode contains a full set of inverted lower case letters, but other characters like upper case letters and numbers are significantly more hit-or-miss. ˙SᖈƎ⟘⟘Ǝᒣ ƎS∀Ɔ ᖈƎԀԀՈ ƎSᖈƎΛNI ƎWOS Ǝᖈ∀ ƎᖈƎH⟘ I tried to fill in the gaps in the inverted character table as much as possible; some look good, some do not. As an example, there is no decent backwards or upside-down capital K, in case you were wondering. Anyway, rather than mix the two sets of characters together, I kept the upside-down lower case characters in one macro, and the upside-down upper case characters in another.
   Again, these were macros that could only be executed through the Massive Tool, not by anyone using a web browser (like the pages linked above); meaning that other people couldn’t use them at all, and even I found them less than convenient at times. I also created a number of other text conversion macros, like Fдцж Cчяɪʟʟɪc, ᚷᛖᚱᛗᚨᚾᛁᚳ ᚱᚢᚾᛖᛊ, and even ひらがな. Eventually, I also started coding macros for the diacritics described in this post, and it just got to be a bit much. So, I decided to put them all onto a single web page for easy access (by me, and anyone else who feels the need). I based some of it (by which I mean I blatantly borrowed some of the code and structure) from the Ⓑⓤⓑⓑⓛⓔ and dıןɟ pages above, and you can see the result RIGHT HERE.
   To use, simply enter your text into the box at the top, and the copy the resulting text that you want out of any of the other boxes below. The very last box, the combining diacritic box, has a number of checkboxes for enabling or disabling various diacritical add-ons; again, you can read this post to see how they can come in handy. There are, as of this writing, ten different text conversion routines on that page; but, knowing me, don’t be surprised if that continues to expand. Also, I’m embedding some codes in there for special characters. If you type :CCCP: into your input text, a hammer and sickle character will be added in the Faux Cyrillic output. :SMILE: also produces a variety of Unicode characters in different output boxes.

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014
8:08 pm
[allah_sulu]
Thursday, March 13th, 2014
6:04 pm
[allah_sulu]
More Uses of Unicode and Diacritics

Strikethrough, Underline, Overline, Small Caps, and Tiny Text

   All of these effects are normally done with HTML codes. However, if you’re posting a comment into a site which doesn’t allow you to use HTML tags, then you may be able to simulate those effects with combining diacritics (applying a line diacritic to each character in the first three examples), or using unicode characters to replace the letters (in the last two). When you do that, you get examples like the below which can be copied and pasted into unicode-compatible comment fields, and displayed by anyone whose browser supports these characters and diacritics:

  • S̶t̶r̶i̶k̶e̶t̶h̶r̶o̶u̶g̶h̶ diacritics from this site

  • U̲n̲d̲e̲r̲l̲i̲n̲e̲ diacritics from this site

  • O̅v̅e̅r̅l̅i̅n̅e̅ diacritics from this site

  • Sᴍᴀʟʟ Cᴀᴘs unicode from this site

  • ᵀᶦᶰʸ ᵀᵉˣᵗ unicode from this site
   Of course, that’s all just the beginning. There are a variety of other effects that can be accomplished by applying diacritics to characters (and they are additive): R̊i̊n̊g̊s̊, c̸r̸o̸s̸s̸h̸a̸t̸c̸h̸i̸n̸g̸, r̾i̾s̾i̾n̾g̾ s̾t̾e̾a̾m̾, s͙t͙a͙r͙s͙, and even ͢Arrows! (Although the last can only be done to the first letter/character of the word/sequence.)
Wednesday, March 12th, 2014
7:38 pm
[allah_sulu]
Tuesday, January 14th, 2014
5:17 pm
[allah_sulu]
“Mom, LJ’s Being a Dildo!”
   While trying to post this collection of pictures to the RandomPictures community, I kept getting an unspecified “Client error” message, and LiveJournal refused to allow the entry to be posted. After breaking it down into pieces, and trying to post each piece individually, I finally located the problem. It wasn’t an HTML error, or that the post was larger than LJ’s allowed maximum size – No, for some reason, LJ refused to post the deadline.com URL indicated in the screencap below. Every other image and link was fine, but I couldn’t post my entry as long as it contained that URL. As soon as I replaced that URL with a TinyURL going to the exact same place, the post went through.
   Has this sort of thing happened to anyone else? Have you found any other URLs which LJ refuses to allow you to include within a post? Do you have any idea why this URL is a resource non grata to LiveJournal?



   http://www.deadline.com/2014/01/golden-globes-es-idea-of-a-michael-j-fox-fun-fact/ is the evil URL in question… And yes, even with the URL just appearing here as plain text, LJ still refused to allow this entry to be posted. I had to futz around with it before I could even display it. Here’s the equivalent TinyURL: http://tinyurl.com/mzucqtb.
4:51 pm
[allah_sulu]
Combining Diacritics

   Combining diacritics are unicode characters like accents or umlauts that, rather than standing on their own like other upstanding characters, combine with existing characters. There are plenty of unicode entities for common accented/modified characters (ç with a cedilla, è with an accent grave, ñ with a tilde, etc.), but not for every possible combination. (Plus, some less common combinations may not be available in every font; unicode is constantly being expanded, but not every system will have the most up-to-date support.) In cases where a specific accented character is required, but doesn’t actually exist in unicode, it can be built by specifying the base character, and then following it with a combining diacritic which adds an accent to whatever character precedes it.
   For me, the situation where this most often arises is when I want to properly spell the name/title Spin̈al Tap with an n-diaeresis. Since there does not exist in unicode an “n” character with an umlaut, I put in a normal “n” and follow it with unicode character U+0308 (&#x308;). That allows me to satisfy my obsession with minor, unimportant details.
   Some of you may be familiar with combining diacritics from the “Zalgo” internet meme, which creates a creepy effect by overdosing text with combining diacritics:

 

I̧̳͍̫̣̦̺̟̼͐̆́͋̅̿̑̉͆͝ͅn̨̛̘̮͈͉̰̟̬̳̑̀̓̽̓̂͛̚͝ͅ ̡̨̺͕̹̙̫͈̮̈́͛̿̑̎̑́͠͝͝ͅḥ̨̛̖̠̫͙͙͉̝͉͐̌͑̂͛̀̃́̐i͕̤̹̥͕̺͓͚͖̗͗͒̔̒̏̔̊̉̏̕s̨͕͖̬͙̠̹̦̹̩̐͒̅̾̀̏̏̂̀͝ ̢̢̹̪͍̘͉̳̥̰̓́̓̈̆͒̋́̾͝ḧ͚̲͓̯͉̩̗̙̗̜́̅̀̎͐̽̃͒̀͘o̧̞͖̫͚̟̫̲̮͈͆́́͛͆͑̾͒̚͝ư̘̲͔͇̥͓̦̤̥̰̔͊͋̐͋́̌̕͝ş̖͇̻͖̺̠̤̺͖͋͒͋̏́̈́̾͌̔͘ȅ̡̯̣͉̮̺͓̟̥͕̆̑̈́̌̍̊̃͘͝ ̢̯̤͔͎͚̬̜̫̙͆̐́͐̈́̅̎̒̕͝i͕̻̮̻̥̙͙͖̖͎̇̑̽̽̃̄̈́̍̉͘ṋ̢̧̣̝͇̜̭̗̩́̒͑̽̈̋͆͗̀͠ ̢̗͉̬͔̱̻͈̱̪͑̊̈́̀͑̅̔̍̈́R̢̞̦͙̭̳̫̘͂̀̑̽̂̏̄͘͜͠͝ͅ’͚̰̦̫̮̠̖̤͔͖̅̇̀̇̌̿̄̊̽̎l͔̬͓͉̩̰̭̙̒̑̿͒̅͊̄̈̆̈́͜͜y̢̗͔͇͈̝̭̼̳͇̽͛̈́̆̆̉̀̐͑̌e̛̮̰̞̻̩̲̭̬̔͛͌̅́̿̾̏̈͜͜ḩ̭̩͓̼͍͔͍̫̮̅̌̉̊̎̈́̇͊͝,̨̫̭̩̤͈̯̩̤̣̍̉̂̿̑̈͘̕̕͠ ̞̗̝̘̣̰̮̣̣̻̉̄̌̾̉̍̎̒͂͝d̜̰̦̰̭̜̼͇̯͎͐͋́̒̾̍́̿̚͝e̲̮͖̠̣͔͈̝͚̘̾̈̃͂̈̏̓͋͘͠a̢͖̥͙̘͉̜̪̰̜̐̓͑̉̃̊͛̍̊̎d̢̛͎̪͔̮̻̦͖̔́́͑̈́͒̔͑͜͜͠ ̡͉͉̪͚͓̣̯͍͆͒̅̐̾̍̀̄̇̿͜C̢̝͎̲͚͚͈͈͓̖͑̇̎͐̅̔͂̿͂͊ẗ̺̯͕͎̭͔͉͇̆̓̐̇̈́̏͌͒̕ͅͅh̡̧̛̺̼͔͖̲̹̲̺͂̀̂́̀̑͑̚͝u̬̗͕̖͖̤̳͈͎͎͋̆͋̏́̃̾̏̒̑l̗̫̼̮͇̯͓̯̘̘͛̈́̍́͛͒͒̆̕͘h̫̪̣̮͍̫̦̭͔̤̿͗̐̅͑̒͋̓͠͠ű̯͇̤͉̯̝̰͉̝̯̆̌̀͒̆͆̍̆̕ ̡̛͔͕̼͚̼̤͇̥͇̃̃̽̋͋́͗̕͠ẘ̡̲̼̺̬̤̮͈̗̿͑̐͂̾̃̽̿̓͜a̫̩̦͎͍̬͇͔̹͋̊̄̑͒́̋͘͘͜͠i̡͔̗̥͕̰͉͉͈̦̇̄̃́͛̈́̊̏̉́t̨̨̛̥̼̟̭̦͖͔̋̈́͛̊͛̇̐̍͜͝s̪͚̲̳̘͉͚̟̳͔̆̽͛̇̔̆̑͌͛͘ ̨̜̲̣͙͇̱̝̜̙͊̏͑̄̌͊̊͂̾̈d̢̨̟̙͇̣̱̖̞̱͌̑͌̐̄̊͒̆̆͛r̛̬͍̦͚̫̦͚͓̗͚͊͆͗̋̊͋̚̚̕è̘̻̟̫̱͖͉̱͍̓͛́͒̓͑̆̕͝ͅa̧̺̙͚͓̲̳̲̥̙͌̂̍̏̐̔̈̍͘̚m̨̪͔̹͇͕̬̝͓͙̐̅̏̋̏͛́̚͝͝ǐ͚͈̹͚̤̱̰̥̼͍͋̅̇̇̈́̋̇̔̑n͔̝̗̦͍͍̗̜͚̓͊̓̓̏́̆̔͊͜͝g̢̥̮̳͙͚̩̘̤̑̓́̍̃̀̀̋̎̚ͅ.̧̛̺̻͉͉̱̱̪̍͒̀̓̎̀̾̍͜͝ͅ

 

Saturday, December 7th, 2013
4:34 pm
[allah_sulu]
Windows Keyboard Shortcuts, and the Massive Tool
   I just found this article the other day, and decided to look it over as it applies to my text/HTML editor, Allah Sulu’s Massive Tool. The key combinations below are described as being for Microsoft Office; but many of them are standard keyboard shortcuts that apply to most Windows programs… And I’ve already made an effort to make the Massive Tool compliant to a lot of Windows standards. (This post is primarily for my personal reference, as I will be making some mods to the next version of the Massive Tool based on this.)

Collapse )
Friday, November 29th, 2013
6:28 pm
[allah_sulu]
A New Series of Tubes

This is the code for the above video:

<iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TwIvUbOhcKE?modestbranding=1&theme=light&end=47&showinfo=0&iv_load_policy=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

YouTube has continued to expand and modify their embedded player parameters. Here’s a description of the ones I’ve used in this post:

   The modestbranding=1 parameter removes the YouTube logo from the control bar at the bottom of the video.
   The old YouTube player allowed a range of colors for the control bar and border. The current player has two themes, light and dark (the default).
   YouTube has long had a start parameter, to start the video at a predetermined point (in seconds) within the video. Now, you can also specify a point at which to end playback.
   This isn’t a new feature, but I often use showinfo=0 to conceal the name of the video from the top of the player.
   Again, this isn’t new; but I often use iv_load_policy=0 to disable annotations during video playback.
Thursday, November 21st, 2013
5:34 pm
[allah_sulu]
LJ Polyglot

two
three

   If you’re an English speaker (or at least have “English” as your default LJ language), you should see “two” and “three” next to those multiple userheads above. Если вы говорите на русском, вы должны увидеть “два” и “три” рядом с изображением выше. Likewise auf Deutsch, en français, en español …
Sunday, November 10th, 2013
9:38 am
[allah_sulu]
Sunday, July 28th, 2013
6:41 pm
[allah_sulu]
Been a while since I made any new userheads, but here are a couple of Despicable Me minions (one-eyed and two):  
Friday, June 28th, 2013
7:46 pm
[allah_sulu]
You Had One Job, LJ
I just noticed that LJ is fiddling with their CSS again, changing the way that the same post is displayed on different pages. When you view the previous post on your friends page or the LJ calendar page, it looks precisely how I meant it to look. However, when you view the post itself with comments, LiveJournal has decided to italicize all blockquoted text despite the lack of italic tags and the lack of intention on my part to make that text italicized. That means that, if I don't want the blockquoted text italicized, then I have to code my posts differently.

This is the code that is required to blockquote text. Note that CSS can be used to change how blockquoted text is displayed. For instance, CSS can be used to make all blockquoted text italic by default; and different LJ pages can (and do) have different CSS settings. (Also, I just noticed that LJ changes the default blockquote margin sizes along with the italics.)

<blockquote>This text is in a blockquote.</blockquote>

Below is a block of code which attempts, through the use of margins, to simulate a plain, unaltered blockquote without using the blockquote tags (as they may have been altered with CSS):

<div style="margin-right: 1cm; margin-left: 1cm; margin-top: 1em; margin-bottom: 1em;">This text has been formatted with margins.</div>

Please note that the right and left margins are one CM (centimeter), while the top and bottom are one EM (typographic measure). Without CSS alterations, those two blocks of code will normally be formatted pretty much the same way.
[ << Previous 20 ]
(download Allah Sulu's Massive Tool here)   About LiveJournal.com